NHDES Solid Waste Operator Continuing Education Credit

Back to the Earth

Yard trimmings and food residuals together constitute 27 percent of the US municipal solid waste stream. That’s a lot of waste to send to landfills when it could become useful and environmentally beneficial compost instead! Composting offers obvious resource management benefits and creates a useful product from organic waste that would otherwise have been landfilled. This workshop, available for all age groups, explains how composting works and how to make it work. (0.75 hour/credit)

Waste = Global Climate Change

This workshop connects waste and global climate change and is followed by a Q&A session. Depending on time, a group break-out session explores and evaluates the school using a waste-focused “School Sustainability Scorecard.” Teams reassemble to report their findings and to reflect on environmental practices and policies the school already has and those they might consider adopting. (0.5 hour/credit)

Healthy Home, Clean Waters

Participants investigate household toxins, primarily cleaning chemicals. They learn how to identify toxic products, why it matters to human health and the environment, how to safely dispose of toxics and how to make or find safer alternatives in the market place. Appropriate for all ages, hands-on activities vary according to group. All participants receive recipe books for making non-toxic products from common, inexpensive items. (1 hour/credit)

Processed Glass Aggregate (PGA): A Certified Waste Derived Product

Glass collected through community recycling programs consists primarily of clear, green, and brown food or beverage containers. Decades ago it was economical to sort this glass by color, but the market price for recycled glass as cullet continues to decrease and the trend is not shifting. For this reason, many state environmental protection and/or transportation departments encourage safe and credible alternative uses of recycled glass as a replacement for other natural aggregate materials (gravel, crushed gravel, or crushed stone).

The Dirt on Dirt: Composting 101

Increasing public concern over air pollution, water quality, and property values, along with more stringent environmental standards have slowed the growth of new landfills and waste-to-energy facilities. Many of these operating facilities are reaching their end-of-life and many communities are not planning to revive them. Composting addresses the issue of decreasing solid waste disposal capacity, and also helps to replenish the earth’s soil – another decreasing commodity.

Act 148 – VT’s Universal Recycling Law: What Do I Need to Know?

Sometimes working in the solid waste field feels like being wrapped in “invisible” red tape. Unseen rules and regulations from many different agencies are lurking in every corner of your facility. Yet knowing what they are, who enforces them, and who can help you comply is far from easy. NRRA’s Act 148 discusses regulatory issues that apply to solid waste facilities in VT and provides resources to help understand it all. (1 Hour/Credit)

China Sword: Current Market Trends in Recycling

Recycling markets are volatile. Revenue fluctuations dictate the materials collected and can create havoc or triumph for community recycling programs. Contract negotiations, shared agreements, broadened markets and local manufacturing can moderate the instability, but it is not an easy or predictable journey. Trends in each industry (paper/paperboard, glass, steel, aluminum, or plastics), the demand for manufactured goods, and global economic cycles are always shifting. NRRA’s China Sword provides current national and regional recycling market scenarios. (0.75 hour/credits)

Things That Go BOOM! And Other Regulated Waste

Even if a facility does not accept regulated waste for disposal, having a working knowledge of the types of regulated wastes, what hazards they present, and the disposal options available for each of them will help operators do their jobs more effectively. Often residents will approach an operator to ask about disposal options. Unfortunately, materials get surreptitiously dropped at the transfer station, and then the operator has to handle them. NRRA’s Things That Go Boom includes general information regarding several common regulated wastes and the best practices to manage these wastes.

Operator Smack Down! (A Safety and Public Relations Training for Waste Facility Operators)

All employees have the right to a workplace free from safety and health hazards. Focusing on how to reduce future costs will avoid liabilities many fold when decision makers who spend time planning are dedicated to properly fitting a facility and supporting a “safety-first” etiquette that prevents injury. NRRA’s Operator Smack Down contains strategies for incorporating safety into facility management, self-inspection guidelines, and recordkeeping policies, including lists of common safety lapses, a table of common hazards, and discussion of hazards by category.

Best Management Practices for Recycling Facilities During COVID-19

Reagan Bissonnette, NRRA Executive Director, and Bonnie Bethune, NRRA Member Services Manager, were joined by Dr. Ben Locwin to discuss COVID-19 best management practices for recycling facilities.  Dr. Locwin addressed questions from live participants. Over 300 people participated in this very informative webinar! 

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