NHDES Solid Waste Operator Continuing Education Credit

Medical Waste: Needles, Pharmaceuticals, Vaping and More

NHDES Credits:  1

Needlestick injuries expose us to bloodborne pathogens, including HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and other viruses. Traces of antibiotics found in river and lake water samples are shifting the delicate balance of aquatic ecosystems. Nicotine (among other toxic substances) in e-cigarettes, vape pens, and cartridges are considered hazardous waste. Vape batteries can start landfill and transfer station fires. What about other items such as inhaler cartridges, epi-pens, needle storage devices?

The 6th R: Cultivating a Culture of Repair

NHDES Credits:  .75

Repair Café events are an empowering response to throw-away society, re-creating a culture that values reuse and repair over disposal. In two Vermont communities, Repair Cafés tap into locals’ knowledge to reduce waste by fixing broken or damaged items that would otherwise be thrown away. This recorded webinar will explore the Repair Café model, lessons learned, community partnerships, nuts and bolts of hosting a repair event, and the broader context of the right to repair movement.

Legislative Updates

NHDES Credits:  1

This recorded panel webinar covers updates from Vermont’s recycling, composting, product stewardship, and waste reduction initiatives as well as Environmental Producer Responsibility stewardship legislation in Massachusetts.

Join the Northeast Resource Recovery Association, your recycling nonprofit, for this webinar to discuss these issues. Cathy Jamieson is a Solid Waste Program Manager at the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation. Ariela Lovett is a Legislative Analyst with the MA Municipal Association.

The Messy Truth about Students and Their Garbage

NHDES Credits:  1

On average, students produce 1.5 pounds of waste every single day. What does that mean? For example, a high school with 535 students did a waste composition study and calculated their waste generation to be 72 tons/year. This is equal to (on average) five and a half school buses!

Using Processed Glass Aggregate in Road and Infrastructure Projects

NHDES Credits:  .75

Did you know that you can use crushed glass in road and infrastructure projects in the place of virgin aggregate such as gravel? For communities with limited options for recycling glass in a cost effective manner, reusing glass locally can be a great alternative.

Food: Too Good to Waste

NHDES Credits:  1

Imagine buying 5 bags of groceries. On your way out of the store, you dump 2 of them directly in the trash. This is the reality for Americans, who waste roughly 40% of food produced for consumption. School cafeterias are no exception, but it doesn't have to be that way! This recorded webinar will outline the wasted food crisis, model methods for measuring wasted cafeteria food, and provide tangible solutions.

Disposal Capacity

NHDES Credits:  1

This recorded panel webinar covered Materials Management Capacity in NH, MA, and VT, which encompassed all disposal capacity (landfill and waste to energy), transfer capacity, Construction and Demolition processing, Municipal Recycling Facilities, and compost.

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