Food Waste and Composting

HB 617 Recycling & Solid Waste Study Committee - Testimony & Report

In the fall of 2019, the New Hampshire HB 617 Recycling & Solid Waste Study Committee held fourteen hearings to study how the State can assist municipalities during challenging recycling markets following China's National Sword.  NRRA’s Executive Director, Reagan Bissonnette, actively participated in these hearings and testified multiple times, along with some NRRA members.  The committee’s extensive final report was issued on November 1, 2019. 

NRRA's recycling markets testimony and the final report are included in this resource.  

NRRA Green Cone Solar Digester Setup

Join NRRA as we set up a Green Cone Solar Digester in a residential yard to accept food scraps from the kitchen!

 

Green Cone Solar Digester Setup

NRRA Composting Through the Seasons

Composting during the summer months is easy, but what about composting the rest of the year? Join NRRA Education Manager, Heather Herring, as she explores composting through the seasons in your own backyard.

NRRA Composting Through the Seasons

 

Tuck Your Worms in at Night: Subpod Food Scrap Composting Setup Video

Keene, NH asked NRRA to research two food scrap composting systems in order to reduce the weight that is going into MSW (Municipal Solid Waste). Heather Herring created a video to show how she set up a Subpod composting system using worms in her yard to test the ease of setup, use, and amount of material she can keep out of the landfill. NRRA would love to work with organizations, schools, or restaurants in the Keene area using food scrap composting systems. Stay tuned for more as this project continues and for more videos!

Recycling, Solid Waste and Composting in NH – Current Issues & Trends

Reagan Bissonnette, Executive Director of NRRA, joined a Nashua Regional Planning Commission meeting to present about current issues and trends with recycling, solid waste, and composting in New Hampshire.  The Nashua Regional Planning Commission's work is conducted primarily for the benefit of its 13 member municipalities that span the Souhegan Valley, Greater Nashua and Hudson/Pelham area in Southern New Hampshire.  NRRA members and members of the public in NRPC's service area were invited to attend this event.

Event Waste Reduction: Styling Your Event Recycling Plan

 

Investigate all the options for zero waste event training programs that expand beyond NRRA's present RecycleMobile program. This includes access to NRRA’s Can Cage aluminum recycling program, additional container approaches, and basic training on how to plan for better materials purchasing and incorporating composting at events. Planning ahead is the most effective tool in reducing waste at special events. What you learn today can be used before, during and after your event.

Educate, Don't Contaminate! A Toolkit to Clean up Recycling

In 2019, ecomaine, waste manager for 400,000 people in Maine, along with four municipal partners, piloted an internship program to address costly recycling contamination.  Before heading out into the communities, interns received a deep dive training into the waste hierarchy and the recent changes to the recycling market. Over 8 weeks, interns tagged recycling bins and provided residents with educational materials on proper recycling that utilized community-based social marketing principles.

Legislative Updates

This recorded panel webinar covers updates from Vermont’s recycling, composting, product stewardship, and waste reduction initiatives as well as Environmental Producer Responsibility stewardship legislation in Massachusetts.

Join the Northeast Resource Recovery Association, your recycling nonprofit, for this webinar to discuss these issues. Cathy Jamieson is a Solid Waste Program Manager at the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation. Ariela Lovett is a Legislative Analyst with the MA Municipal Association.

Fee and payment Information:

The Messy Truth about Students and Their Garbage

On average, students produce 1.5 pounds of waste every single day. What does that mean? Well for example, a high school with 535 students did a waste composition study and calculated their waste generation to be 72 tons/year. This is equal to (on average) five and a half school buses!

Food: Too Good to Waste

Imagine buying 5 bags of groceries. On your way out of the store, you dump 2 of them directly in the trash. This is the reality for Americans, who waste roughly 40% of food produced for consumption. School cafeterias are no exception, but it doesn't have to be that way! This recorded webinar will outline the wasted food crisis, model methods for measuring wasted cafeteria food, and provide tangible solutions.

Pages